Sports
3:20 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

Cash-Strapped L.A. Dodgers Shop For A New Owner

Los Angeles Dodgers players high-five after beating the San Diego Padres 2-0 at Petco Park in San Diego on Sept. 23, 2011.
Denis Poroy Getty Images

The Los Angeles Dodgers are one of professional sports' most storied franchises. But they're up for auction because much-maligned and outgoing owner Frank McCourt was forced to put the team under bankruptcy protection last summer.

Now, preliminary bids for the Dodgers are due on Monday. The team lost its luster during McCourt's ownership, but estimates for the winning bid range from $1.2 to $2 billion, dwarfing the record $845 million paid for the Chicago Cubs a couple of years ago.

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All Tech Considered
3:14 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

Stanford Takes Online Schooling To The Next Academic Level

Stanford Engineering's Online Introduction To Artificial Intelligence is made up of videos that teach lessons by drawing them out with pen and paper.
knowitvideos vie YouTube

Originally published on Mon January 23, 2012 4:25 pm

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The Two-Way
3:00 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

Sen. Rand Paul Suspects He Was Randomly Picked For Pat-Down

The news that Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) was stopped by Transportation Security Administration screeners this morning at the Nashville airport and delayed for about an hour is whipping around the Web.

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Korva Coleman is a newscaster for NPR.

In this role, she is responsible for writing, producing, and delivering national newscasts airing during NPR's newsmagazines All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition. Occasionally she serves as a substitute host for Talk of the Nation, Weekend All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Before joining NPR in 1990, Coleman was a staff reporter and copy editor for the Washington Afro-American newspaper. She produced and hosted First Edition, an overnight news program at NPR's member station WAMU-FM in Washington, D.C.

Early in her career, Coleman worked in commercial radio as news and public affairs directors at stations in Phoenix and Tucson.

Middle East
2:31 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

In Egypt, Islamists Take Control Of A New Parliament

Egypt's recently elected parliament, which is dominated by Islamists, held its first session in Cairo on Monday. The challenges facing the legislature include coming up with a new constitution.
Asmaa Waguih AP

Egypt's Islamists formalized their new stature on Monday as the first freely elected parliament in six decades held its inaugural session in Cairo.

The session was broadcast live on Egyptian state television and was largely spent swearing in the 508 members, most of whom belong to the Muslim Brotherhood and ultra-conservative Salafist movement.

But outside the parliament, not everyone was celebrating.

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Technology
2:28 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

Niche No More: Survey Shows Tablets Are Everywhere

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos introduces the new Kindle Fire tablet in New York, on September 28, 2011. The Fire's strong holiday sales were part of a trend that now has nearly a third of all American adults owning an e-book reader or tablet computer.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

A few weeks ago, Mike Wendlinger bought himself a Christmas present — a Nook Simple Touch e-book reader. And when he did, he joined a wave of Americans who have combined to make e-readers and their more powerful bretheren, tablet computers, into genuine mass market devices.

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The Two-Way
2:27 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

Federal Workers Owe $1.03 Billion In Unpaid Taxes

Here's your interesting numbers story of the day: Based on The Washington Post's analysis of Internal Revenue Service records, about 98,000 federal employees — including those from the post office — owed $1.03 billion in unpaid taxes. It's a number that has been reported before but this year, while the number of delinquent employees fell, the total amount owed ballooned by $32 million or 3 percent.

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The Two-Way
2:25 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

Gingrich On Jobless: 'We Shouldn't Give People 99 Weeks To Do Nothing'

Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich and his wife Callista Gingrich (in red) greet people during an event at the The River Church in Tampa, Fla., earlier today (Jan. 23, 2011).
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 23, 2012 2:48 pm

Republican presidential contender Newt Gingrich today made the case that those who have been collecting jobless benefits for extended periods of time should be required to enroll in job-training programs, saying that "we shouldn't give people 99 weeks to do nothing," our colleagues at WUSF in Tampa report.

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Linda Holmes writes and edits NPR's entertainment and pop-culture blog, Monkey See. She has several elaborate theories involving pop culture and monkeys, all of which are available on request.

Holmes began her professional life as an attorney. In time, however, her affection for writing, popular culture and the online universe eclipsed her legal ambitions. She shoved her law degree in the back of the closet, gave its living-room space to DVD sets of The Wire and never looked back.

Monkey See
2:00 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

'I'd Rather Be A Mystery': John Hawkes On Keeping His Hat Pulled Down

John Hawkes and Elizabeth Olsen in 2011's Martha Marcy May Marlene.
Fox Searchlight

Originally published on Mon January 23, 2012 4:25 pm

John Hawkes' conversation with Melissa Block on today's All Things Considered begins as many of his conversations might: with her noting that when she told people she was coming to talk to him and rattled off his credits, she got a response that he undoubtedly gets a lot: "Ohhh, he's that guy."

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