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Business
2:00 am
Tue January 24, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Tue January 24, 2012 8:00 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with another powerful woman in Brazil.

The Brazilian state oil company has a new chief executive. Her name is Maria das Gracas Foster. Petrobras is the world's fifth-largest oil producer, and Foster becomes the first woman to run a top-five oil company. This comes as the firm looks to double its production by 2020.

The company's stocks surged on news of the appointment. Foster will be the second-most powerful woman in Brazil, after the president. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Cheryl Corley is an NPR correspondent who works for the National Desk and is based in Chicago. She travels throughout the Midwest covering issues and events throughout the region's 12 states.

In recent years, Corley has reported on the campaign and re-election of President Barack Obama, on the efforts by Illinois officials to rethink the state's Juvenile Justice System, on youth violence in Chicago, and on political turmoil in the Illinois state government. She's reported on the infamous Trayvon Martin shooting case in Florida and covered tornadoes that have destroyed homes and claimed lives in Harrisburg, Illinois; small towns in Oklahoma; and Joplin, Missouri.

Emily’s love of music brought her to public radio, where she found her love for news. After receiving a Bachelor of Arts in music at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, she began her career in 2003 at WFIU Public Radio in Bloomington, Indiana, producing and hosting music and news programs and learning the behind-the-scenes work of public broadcasting. She joined WYSO in 2007 as the host of “All Things Considered” and jumped head first into news gathering. Emily’s been relishing it ever since-her reporting has earned her numerous AP Awards and a nationally recognized Gabriel Award. WYSO has been a fulfilling and exciting place for Emily, where she is privileged to work with a creative and supportive staff.

It's All Politics
11:34 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

Romney Redux: Did The Front-Runner Find A Way Back In?

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich debate at the University of South Florida in Tampa on Monday.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 7:35 am

On Tuesday, it is likely the presidential campaign's focus will shift to Mitt Romney's tax returns, which show him making $42.5 million in 2010 and 2011. That number may be bigger than he can finesse by saying in essence: Don't hate me because I'm successful.

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It's All Politics
10:26 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

Romney Attacks, Gingrich Doesn't As Both Give GOP Voters Reasons To Doubt

After Newt Gingrich's bravura performance in the final South Carolina debate and his drubbing of Mitt Romney on primary day, the former speaker's challenge in Monday night's debate in Tampa, Fla., was to maintain if not increase his momentum eight days before the Florida Republican presidential primary.

Meanwhile, Romney's challenge was to give his supporters who were shell-shocked by the Palmetto State results reasons to believe he had it in him to turn it around, to stand to do what needed to be done to beat Gingrich in Florida.

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Books
10:01 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

How Dr. Seuss Got His Start 'On Mulberry Street'

Courtesy Random House Children's Books

Seventy five years ago, before Theodor Geisel rocked the culinary world with green eggs and ham or put a red-and-white striped top hat on a talking cat, Geisel (who you probably know better as Dr. Seuss) was stuck on a boat, returning from a trip to Europe.

For eight days, he listened to the ship's engine chug away. The sound got stuck in his head and he started writing to the rhythm. Eventually, those rhythmic lines in his head turned into his first children's book: It was called And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street.

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Around the Nation
10:01 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

Online Lottery Could Be Coming To A State Near You

Several states — including Illinois and New York — are now pushing forward with plans to offer lotteries on the Internet.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue January 24, 2012 1:49 am

Several states — including Illinois and New York — are now pushing forward with plans to offer lotteries on the Internet. That's in the aftermath of an opinion from the Justice Department, which reverses a long-standing policy and says states are free to conduct online gambling within their borders.

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Setting Out: New Grads' Quest For Work
10:01 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

Landing A Job After A Year Of Rejection

Students graduating from college are entering perhaps the toughest, most uncertain job market in generations. In our series, we met recent grads who shared the frustrations and fears they faced as they set out in search of work. In this installment, we follow-up with one of our previous grads who has now landed a job after a yearlong search.

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Around the Nation
10:01 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

In Conn., Tribes Hope To Win Big With Online Poker

Gamblers play on some of the more than 6,000 slot machines at Mohegan Sun in Uncasville, Conn. The casino is owned and operated by the Mohegan Tribe.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Connecticut has two casinos that generate millions of dollars a year for the state. Following a recent change in the interpretation of regulations against online gambling, casino operators and state officials are closely watching to see what kind of impact online poker will have on their revenue.

Even though it's a weekday, there are plenty of people are sitting at slot machines or playing table games at the Mohegan Sun Casino in Uncasville, Connecticut.

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Utah News
6:41 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

Redistricting Records Made Available, at a Price

Utah Democrats are paying a $5,000 fee to obtain legislative records related to the state's redistricting process. Party Chairman Jim Dabakis says the records are needed to determine whether the party can file a lawsuit seeking to overturn the election maps approved in October.

Dabakis says the state shouldn't be charging fees for public records.

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