Africa
2:00 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

How Teenagers Learned To Hate Joseph Kony

Joseph Kony in southern Sudan in 2006. His exact whereabouts today are unknown.
STR AP

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 2:25 pm

If you're a teenager, you probably hadn't heard of Joseph Kony last week. This week, you probably couldn't avoid him.

"If I log onto Facebook or Twitter any time during the day, it's my entire news feed, basically," says Patrick Franks, an 18-year-old senior at Loyola Blakefield High School, outside Baltimore.

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Utah News
1:56 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Busy and Boring - Wrapping Up the 2012 Legislative Session

After 45 days of negotiating bills and budgets, the Utah Legislature wrapped up its business last night at midnight. Jessica Gail reports on what lawmakers got done over the last six weeks.

Weather
1:52 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Friday Forecast - 3/9

Enjoy the transition from winter to spring, courtesy of the Utah Climate Center.

Europe
1:46 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

A Health Care Tragedy Plays Out In A Greek Port

Near the port of Piraeus and about 10 miles west of Athens, Perama developed after the Greek civil war of the 1940s, growing prosperous in the 1980s thanks to the ship-repair industry.

But now, the once-bustling piers are deserted. A few rusting skeletons of unfinished boats stand outside empty, abandoned warehouses.

That's because business migrated to low-cost Turkey and China, and in a few short years, industry jobs dropped from 4,500 to 50.

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Rebuilding Japan
1:41 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

For Kids In Japan, Adjusting To A Changed World

Students at Tohoku Chosen, an elementary and junior high school for North Koreans in Sendai City, now take dance classes in the school's cafeteria because their main building was destroyed when the earthquake struck northeast Japan last March.
Doualy Xaykaothao NPR

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 8:22 pm

Teacher Dave Rowlands is talking to his students in a kindergarten class at Imagine Japan, an English-language school in the Miyagi Prefecture of Sendai City. The school is just a short walk from pre-fabricated homes built for families who lost more than just property in the earthquake and tsunami last year.

"What came after the earthquake, was what?" Rowlands asks. "A tidal wave. In Japanese, what do we say? Or in English, actually, tsunami is now used around the world in many languages. Tsunami. We kind of leave the 't' off of there."

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The Picture Show
1:19 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

In Battle For Rhino Horns, A Clash Of Cultures

A white rhino cow (left) grazes with a bull that has become her companion after a poaching attack in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa.
Brent Stirton National Geographic

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:58 am

Rhino poaching has been on the rise in the past few years. In South Africa and other regions where rhinos run, poachers have been killing or darting rhinos with tranquilizers for their horns.

Rather than adorning walls, many horns are ground up into medicines, sold mostly in Southeast Asia. A possible — yet controversial — way to stop poaching may be rhino ranches, where the horns are harvested for sale and the animals are allowed to grow new ones.

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The Two-Way
1:18 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Syrian Opposition Leader Rejects Annan's Call For Dialogue

Syrian National Council leader Burhan Ghalioun attends a news conference in Paris on March 1.
Thibault Camus AP

The leader of Syria's main opposition group has some harsh words for Kofi Annan, who was appointed by the U.N. to be its envoy to Syria.

In an interview with the Associated Press Burhan Ghalioun said Annan's comments so far have been "disappointing."

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It's All Politics
1:12 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Despite Mixed Polls, Gingrich Claims Lead In Southern States

Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich speaks at a rally with his wife, Callista, on Thursday in Jackson, Miss.
Marianne Todd Getty Images

Mitt Romney may consider the pair of primaries in Alabama and Mississippi on Tuesday an "away game," but Newt Gingrich is claiming a home court advantage.

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Sports
1:00 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

Preview To March Madness

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 4:00 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Flip through the channels this weekend and you are bound to see some college students dribbling basketballs. It is March after all. And the final lay-ups, jump shots and dunks are taking place before the madness officially begins next week. NCAA conference championships wrap up on Sunday and then comes the selection of teams for their respective NCAA tournaments. Sportswriter Stefan Fatsis joins us now as he does most Fridays. Hi, Stefan.

STEFAN FATSIS, BYLINE: Hey, Robert.

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Middle East
1:00 pm
Fri March 9, 2012

U.S., Afghan Officials Sign Prison Agreement

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 4:00 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. In Afghanistan today, a small breakthrough that may help avert a major crisis. U.S. and Afghan officials signed an agreement regarding the largest American-run prison in the country. This is the same prison where last month U.S. soldiers burned several copies of the Quran, setting off riots and reprisal attacks on Americans. NPR's Quil Lawrence reports from Kabul.

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