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Afghanistan
3:58 am
Fri March 16, 2012

Peace Deal Process With Taliban Stalls

Originally published on Fri March 16, 2012 7:24 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

We're learning more about the American staff sergeant accused of killing 16 villagers in Afghanistan. Last night, his lawyer said the soldier did not want to go to Afghanistan, his fourth deployment for the Army. He had been wounded twice and he didn't think he was healthy enough to deploy. The attorney didn't release the soldier's name, but did say he was the father of two young children and added that the soldier's family was totally shocked by the allegations against him.

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Latin America
2:47 am
Fri March 16, 2012

'Dirty War' Children Returned To Argentine Relatives

Originally published on Fri March 16, 2012 7:24 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne with Steve Inskeep.

The heirs to one Latin America's biggest media conglomerates, a brother and a sister, spent years with their real identities in question. They've long been thought to be part of a group of children stolen from their birth parents more than 30 years ago. That was during Argentina's Dirty War, the terror campaign waged by the military junta then ruling Argentina against members of the opposition.

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Middle East
2:02 am
Fri March 16, 2012

A Death In Syria

Abdulrahman Abu Lebdeh was a Syrian protester who was killed last fall in his hometown of Tal Kalakh.
Courtesy of Abu Lebdeh family

Originally published on Fri March 16, 2012 9:14 am

The United Nations estimates some 8,000 people have been killed in Syria since the uprising began one year ago. One of them was Abdulrahman Abu Lebdeh, 24, who was killed in the town of Tal Kalakh last fall. His parents, his brother and one of his friends, who was also an activist, told the story of his life and death to NPR's Kelly McEvers and Lava Selo.

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NPR Story
2:00 am
Fri March 16, 2012

'Footnote' Takes On Ambition, Father-Son Rivalry

Originally published on Sun March 18, 2012 9:58 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The Israeli film "Footnote" has racked up a pile of awards - Best Screenplay at Cannes, nine awards at Israel's Oscars, and a nomination for Best Foreign Language film at the Academy Awards.

Film critic Kenneth Turan says it's all deserved.

KENNETH TURAN: "Footnotes"'s subject matter sounds dry, unlikely, even obscure. The film is set in Jerusalem's Hebrew University and deals with the implacable rivalry between two scholars of the Talmud, the complex and sacred text of the Jewish religious tradition.

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NPR Story
2:00 am
Fri March 16, 2012

Russia To Join World Trade Organization

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And anyone listening in on yesterday's debate at the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, you might have wondered whether the Cold War was really over.

At issue, whether to repeal trade a law aimed at pressuring the Soviet Union to allow Jewish emigration.

As Peter van Dyk reports from Moscow, remarkably it's a law that continues to have serious trade implications even today.

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NPR Story
2:00 am
Fri March 16, 2012

Business News

The Federal Trade Commission is looking at complaints raised last month when it was discovered Google was bypassing the privacy settings on Apple's Safari browsers to track user activity on the web. The agency wants to know whether the company "misrepresented" its privacy policy.

StoryCorps
10:01 pm
Thu March 15, 2012

After Tragedy, An Aunt Plays A New Role: Parent

Laura (left) and Phil Donney (right), with their Aunt Abby, whom they call "Tabby."
Liebman Family Photo

One night in 1995 completely reshaped the lives of Phil and Laura Donney. Their parents were arguing, and their father stabbed their mother, killing her. Phil was 7; his sister was 4.

Ken Donney was sent to prison, and the children went to live with their mother's sisters.

Phil, 23, recently sat down with his aunt, Abby Leibman, the twin sister of his mother, Nina Leibman.

"What was it like becoming a parent to my sister and I overnight?" Phil asks.

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Digital Life
10:01 pm
Thu March 15, 2012

Petitions Are Going Viral, Sometimes To Great Success

Petition signatures sit in a box at a Sept. 21, 2011, news conference in Washington, D.C. The signatures, collected by Change.org and other groups, were delivered to congressional co-sponsors of legislation to ban hiring discrimination against unemployed workers.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Petitions have been a common form of protest throughout modern history, at times bringing attention to causes through little more than handwritten letters and word of mouth.

But like a lot of other things, petitions are going viral. And one website in particular has contributed to the phenomenon.

Change.org offers tools to let individuals start their own online campaigns, a way to bring instant awareness to issues that range from the environment to human rights.

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The Record
10:01 pm
Thu March 15, 2012

Ann Powers From The Streets Of Austin

Bruce Springsteen and the retooled E Street Band ripped through a nearly three-hour "secret" concert at the Moody Theater, the new home of Austin City Limits, during SXSW. Ever the showman, Springsteen crowd-surfed.
Michael Buckner Getty Images for SXSW

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 2:37 pm

The SXSW music convention takes over Austin, Texas, for five days each March. This year, NPR Music's Ann Powers is in Austin trying to catch as much of the action as she can. At South By Southwest's midpoint, Powers spoke to Morning Edition's Renee Montagne about the highlights so far (including that awesome Springsteen keynote, which you can listen to in its entirety), and what she's looking forward to seeing over the festival's second half.

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Crisis In The Housing Market
10:01 pm
Thu March 15, 2012

Foreclosure Influx Causes Backlog In Some States

A padlock hangs from a door of a foreclosed home in Islip, N.Y. The time a foreclosure will take from start to finish varies widely from state to state.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Real estate is about location, location, location. And foreclosure is no different. Depending on the state, it can take an average of three months or three years to process a foreclosure. And the disparity in how states deal with foreclosures is getting bigger.

The fate of thousands of troubled homeowners in Central Florida rests in the hands of Lee Haworth, foreclosure administrative judge for Florida's 12th Judicial Circuit. "We were hit pretty hard," Haworth says.

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