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Law
5:20 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Justices Limit State Liability Under Medical Leave Act

Daniel Coleman outside the U.S. Supreme Court after oral arguments in his case in January. On Tuesday, the justices ruled against Coleman, holding that that states cannot be sued for money damages for failing to give an employee time off to recover from an illness under the Family and Medical Leave Act.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 6:18 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that states cannot be sued for money damages for failing to give an employee time off under the Family and Medical Leave Act to recover from an illness. The vote was 5 to 4 with no legal theory commanding a clear majority.

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It's All Politics
4:54 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Illinois: Live Blog And Results

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and his wife, Ann Romney, celebrate his victory in the Illinois GOP primary at the Renaissance Schaumburg Convention Center Hotel in Schaumburg, Ill.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:56 am

With a decisive victory in Illinois, Mitt Romney is firmly in the driver's seat of the Republican presidential nomination contest.

In a victory speech in Schaumburg, Ill., the former Massachusetts governor thanked his Republican opponents, but very quickly pivoted to the general election against President Obama.

"It's time to say this word," said Romney. "Enough. We've had enough... We need a president who believes in us."

This Romney speech even sounded different. With Romney restating the big ideals of his campaign, it sounded like an acceptance speech.

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Law
4:14 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Supreme Court Considers Life Sentences For Juveniles

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments on Tuesday in two cases that ask whether it is constitutional to sentence juveniles to life in prison without parole.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in two murder cases testing whether it is unconstitutionally cruel and unusual punishment to sentence a 14-year-old to life in prison without the possibility of parole. There are currently 79 people serving such life terms for crimes committed when they were 14 or younger.

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The Salt
3:44 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

At The Community Garden, It's Community That's The Hard Part

One of the community gardens divided up into individual plots run by Denver Urb Gardens.
Courtesy of Denver Urb Gardens

Originally published on Wed March 21, 2012 9:20 am

You may think that the great historic debate between communism and private property is over.

Well, it's not. Not at your local community garden.

Take, for example, the experience of Campos Community Garden in Manhattan's East Village.

Eight years ago, the garden was decrepit and abandoned. Beverly McClain walked by it all the time, on the way to her daughter's school. And one day, she and a motley group of fellow gardeners decided to revive it.

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Access Utah
3:42 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Homelessness - Join our Discussion on Wednesday

Our topic Wednesday is homelessness.  Tom Williams’ guests will include Pamela Atkinson, a leading advocate for Utah’s homeless, and Leon Anderson, Head of the Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Anthropology at Utah State University and coauthor of Down on Their Luck: A Study of Homeless Street People.  He’ll give the Timepiece titled: “Criminalization of Mental Illness and the Promise of Mental Health Courts” at USU's College of Humanities and Social Sciences’ Kiger Hour on Thursday in Logan.

UPR News Feature
3:34 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Women's History Month, Part III: What It Means to Be a Woman in Academia

March is women's history month, and the national theme Women's Education, Women's Empowerment is applicable not just to students, but also to women in academia. Storee Powell talks with Utah State University's Dr. Christy Glass, a gender scholar and researcher, who not only studies the struggles of women entering academia, but experiences it first-hand as a female associate professor.

Commentary
3:27 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Steve Eaton Spends a Day in Mitt's Shoes

Mitt's been in such a good mood lately...Steve doesn't want to be around when he finds out he doesn't get to be president. Still, he feels a little bit sorry for him and is willing to bet you $10,000 that you wouldn't want to be him.

Author Interviews
3:16 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

'Shoah' Director Details Memoirs In 'Patagonian Hare'

Claude Lanzmann published his memoir, Le Lièvre de Patagonie, in France in 2009. The Patagonian Hare has now been translated into English.
Helie Gallimar Farrar, Straus and Giroux

Seventy years ago, in the middle of World War II, a couple of hundred miles north of Toulouse, Claude Lanzmann was a high school student — and an assimilated French Jew. Every day he faced the risk of arrest.

When Lanzmann was a teenager, both he and his father independently joined the Communist Resistance. He writes about that in his newly translated memoir, The Patagonian Hare.

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Opinion
3:06 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Trayvon Martin: The Lingering Memory Of Dead Boys

Attorney Benjamin Crump speaks to the medial, holding cellphone records and a police report. He represents the family of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, who was was killed by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman on Feb. 26 in Sanford, Fla.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 5:05 pm

Tayari Jones has written for McSweeney's, The New York Times and The Believer. Her most recent book is Silver Sparrow.

Like many Americans, I have been glued to the television eager for details about the tragic murder of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. I am not sure what I hoped to discover, as each new piece of evidence is more disturbing than the last.

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Weather
3:04 pm
Tue March 20, 2012

Tuesday Forecast - 3/20

Happy Vernal Equinox, UPR listeners! It's officially spring, and the cold snap will be gone faster than you can say "frozen tulips".

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