Planet Money
12:49 am
Fri April 27, 2012

When Should A Country Abandon Its Own Money?

Enough already with the krona?
Jesse Garrison Flickr

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 10:16 am

Iceland is a tiny nation in a big financial mess. It's still recovering from the aftermath of the 2008 global economic crisis, which caused a domestic banking collapse.

Its currency, the krona, is also in really bad shape. That's led Icelanders to pose an existential currency question: Should they abandon the krona?

One key problem is size. Iceland has about as many people as Staten Island, so there just aren't that many people on the planet who need to use the krona.

"There are more people using Disney dollars," says Arsaell Valfells, an Icelandic economist.

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Around the Nation
12:48 am
Fri April 27, 2012

Can Helmets Cut Tornado Deaths? CDC Isn't So Sure

Noah Stewart shelters in the closet just 15 minutes before an April 2011 tornado demolished his house. Wearing the helmet may have saved his life, one doctor says.
Courtesy of the Stewart family

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 6:04 pm

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Shots - Health Blog
12:46 am
Fri April 27, 2012

Wanted: Mavericks And Missionaries To Solve Mississippi's M.D. Shortage

Janie Guice is the recruiter for the Mississippi Rural Physician Scholarship Program.
Jeffrey Hess for NPR

Originally published on Fri April 27, 2012 3:19 pm

When Janie Guice looks at the Mississippi Delta she sees a vast, flat flood plain home to cotton fields and catfish farms. She also sees desperate rural health problems and a deep shortage of doctors to offer care. Her job: to find doctors to fill that void.

"Who is the one that is going to go back and live in a community that maybe doesn't even have a Wal-Mart? And yes, there are a lot of communities in Mississippi that don't have a Wal-Mart yet!" Guice laments.

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Opinion
12:45 am
Fri April 27, 2012

In L.A., Dreams Of Sunshine Became A Nightmare

National Guardsmen watch a business go up in flames in South Los Angeles on April 30, 1992. The riots erupted after a mostly white jury acquitted police officers accused in the beating of black motorist Rodney King.
Hal Garb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 27, 2012 6:41 am

Commentator John Ridley moved to Los Angeles 20 years ago, not long before the riots.

Look, I was always going to end up in Los Angeles. From the time I was a kid in Wisconsin, for me, L.A. was the city. It had sunshine, palm trees, a black mayor, even a police force whose legend was preached nightly on hit TV shows.

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Education
12:44 am
Fri April 27, 2012

Teaching The LA Riots At Two City Schools

Smoke rises as fires burn out of control near Vermont Street in Los Angeles on April 30, 1992. Riots erupted after L.A. police officers were acquitted in the beating of black motorist Rodney King.
Paul Sakuma AP

Originally published on Fri April 27, 2012 8:22 pm

It has been 20 years since four police officers were acquitted in the beating of Rodney King, and L.A. erupted in race-fueled riots. Many in Los Angeles, including students who weren't born when the riots hit in April 1992, are reflecting on those days of anger, looting and destruction, asking why it happened and how to make sure it doesn't happen again.

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Europe
12:42 am
Fri April 27, 2012

Showdown Looms Over Europe's Largest Shantytown

Residents of Cañada Real stand near recently demolished shacks on March 5. The settlement is separated into different sections and tends to be segregated by ethnic groups: Roma in one section, Arabs in another, for example.
Susana Vera Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri April 27, 2012 8:24 pm

Europe's largest illegal settlement lies on the edge of Madrid. As the Spanish capital has grown, the city's limits have moved ever closer to the shantytown known as Cañada Real, a sprawling tangle of tents and cement houses. And as the economy has tanked, a growing number of people are calling it home.

Now the city is eyeing the property for possible development.

The roads in Cañada Real are unpaved. Houses are made of corrugated metal or cement. Some lots are just piles of garbage.

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Science Questions
6:56 pm
Thu April 26, 2012

Death from the Skies: an Apocalyptic Science Questions

Get ready for a live Science Questions, when Sheri Quinn learns all about the end of the world from astronomer Phil Plait. Will a coronal mass ejection and solar flares knock out half the Earth's power and leave millions in the cold? Will a huge asteroid strike the Earth and send us the way of the dinosaurs? Perhaps our planet will be sucked into a giant black hole. Scariest of all could be supernovae close enough to cause mass extinction.

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Ogden
6:04 pm
Thu April 26, 2012

"Beacon on the Hill" - Weber State Campus Goes Dark

Weber State University's Ogden campus, that "beacon on the hill," went dim today. Bad wiring is at fault, but help is on the way.

The Social Science, Student Services, and Visual Arts buildings will be operating on emergency power Thursday and Friday as extensive repair work with specialized equipment is underway.

Employees who work in those buildings should contact their supervisors, according to John Kowalewski, campus spokesman. He said that the campus will provide alternatives for students needing to pay bills or register for summer term with student services.

Commentary
5:54 pm
Thu April 26, 2012

Lessons for Arbor Day

Before there was Earth Day, there was Arbor Day. Commentator Thad Boxx reminds us of the lessons we can learn from this day set aside for tree planting, an action described by Arbor Day's founder as "faith expressed in a deed".

Arbor Day is Friday, April 27.

Commentary
5:24 pm
Thu April 26, 2012

Sammy Hagar Built This City on Rock and Roll

Cabo San Lucas was built on rock-n-roll if any city ever was...and built by Sammy Hagar at that. Ed Kociela tells the story of how Cabo Wabo came to be and how it shaped the whole development of Los Cabos.

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