Tom Williams http://upr.org en Wrenched: The Legacy Of Ed Abbey on Access Utah Tuesday http://upr.org/post/wrenched-legacy-ed-abbey-access-utah-tuesday <p>We remember Ed Abbey, author of “The Monkey Wrench Gang” and “Desert Solitaire,” and consider his legacy. What is Abbey's relevance today? What is the status of the environmental movement today?&nbsp;We’ll talk about Abbey's political philosophies, rooted in traditions of anarchism and civil disobedience, the rise of Earth First! out of Abbey's writings, and "monkeywrenching" today, including Abbey’s influence on activists like Tim DeChristopher.</p><p><strong><a href="http://upr.org/post/legacy-ed-abbey-wednesdays-access-utah" target="_blank">Listen to Access Utah here.</a></strong></p> Tue, 29 Jul 2014 16:28:38 +0000 Tom Williams 44670 at http://upr.org Wrenched: The Legacy Of Ed Abbey on Access Utah Tuesday Unintended Reformation On Access Utah Monday http://upr.org/post/unintended-reformation-access-utah-monday <p></p><p>In his book, “The Unintended Reformation: How a Religious Revolution Secularized Society,” Notre Dame History Professor Brad Gregory shows how the unsolved doctrinal disagreements and religious and political conflicts of&nbsp;16th- and&nbsp;17th-century&nbsp;Europe continue to influence American political, social, intellectual, and economic life today.</p><p>He asks what propelled the West into a trajectory of pluralism, polarization and&nbsp;consumerism, and finds answers deep in our medieval Christian past.</p><p> Mon, 28 Jul 2014 18:37:50 +0000 Tom Williams 44628 at http://upr.org Unintended Reformation On Access Utah Monday How To Quinoa on Access Utah Wednesday http://upr.org/post/how-quinoa-access-utah-wednesday <p>Forget the royal baby and Suri Cruise. Meet Quinoa, a viral sensation and star of the popular Pinterest board, My Imaginary Well-Dressed Toddler Daughter. Quinoa is a trendy, fashion-forward girl who, when she’s not hanging out with her BFFs Chevron and Aioli, is teaching the world about proper parenting, fashion and accessorization, etiquette for play dates, and much more.</p> Wed, 23 Jul 2014 16:30:24 +0000 Tom Williams 44408 at http://upr.org How To Quinoa on Access Utah Wednesday Tibet: An Unfinished Story on Monday's Access Utah http://upr.org/post/tibet-unfinished-story-mondays-access-utah <p></p> Mon, 21 Jul 2014 18:21:03 +0000 Tom Williams 44415 at http://upr.org Tibet: An Unfinished Story on Monday's Access Utah The Lame God on Thursday's Access Utah http://upr.org/post/lame-god-thursdays-access-utah <p>M. B. McLatchey is recipient of the May Swenson Poetry Award for “The Lame God,” a collection of powerful poems on a very sensitive subject: the kidnap and murder of a young girl. Using the art of poetry she gives voice to a suffering—and a love—that might otherwise go unheard. Philip Brady says of this collection, “in magisterial cadences, this powerful poetic sequence gives voice to the unspeakable and transposes profound grief into immortal song. McLatchey's poems are talismans and spells--not against loss but against forgetting. Thu, 17 Jul 2014 17:10:10 +0000 Tom Williams 44472 at http://upr.org The Lame God on Thursday's Access Utah Trees In Paradise On Access Utah Wednesday http://upr.org/post/trees-paradise-access-utah-wednesday <p>On Wednesday’s AU we’ll revisit our conversation from January with Jared Farmer whose latest book is “Trees in Paradise: A California History.” &nbsp;In addition to California, we’ll talk about Utah history, and Farmer will offer his list of iconic Utah trees as well. California now has more trees than at any time since the late Pleistocene. This green landscape, however, is not the work of nature. It's the work of history. In the years after the Gold Rush, American settlers remade the California landscape, harnessing nature to their vision of the good life. Wed, 16 Jul 2014 17:45:19 +0000 Tom Williams 44418 at http://upr.org Trees In Paradise On Access Utah Wednesday What's In Your Bookbag? Reading On Access Utah Tuesday http://upr.org/post/whats-your-bookbag-reading-access-utah-tuesday <p>What’s on your nightstand or in your beach bag? Periodically we come together as a UPR community to build a reading list. And It’s time once again. We want to know what you’re reading, whether it’s fiction, non-fiction, classic literature, young adult or children’s books. You may have discovered a great read that we’d enjoy. &nbsp;You can post your book list to <a href="mailto:upraccess@gmail.com">upraccess@gmail.com</a> or call 1-800-826-1495 during Access Utah Tuesday from 9:00 to 10:00 a.m. Elaine Thatcher will join Tom Williams for the program; and we’ll check in with Catherine Weller from Weller Book Works in SLC and other booksellers.</p><p><strong>Access Utah Booklist: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 17:16:02 +0000 Tom Williams 44417 at http://upr.org What's In Your Bookbag? Reading On Access Utah Tuesday Designing America on Access Utah Monday http://upr.org/post/designing-america-access-utah-monday <p>Frederick Law Olmsted, the father of American landscape architecture, made public parks an essential part of American life and forever changed our relationship with public open spaces. He was co-designer of Central Park, head of the first Yosemite commission, leader of the campaign to protect Niagara Falls, designer of the U.S. Capitol Grounds, site planner for the Great White City of the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, planner of Boston’s “Emerald Necklace” of green space, and of park systems in many other cities.</p><p></p><p>Olmsted’s design of the public parks and parkway systems in Buffalo, New York, is the oldest coordinated system in America and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. To Olmsted, a park was both a work of art and a necessity for urban life. His efforts to preserve nature created an “environmental ethic” decades before the environmental movement became a force in American politics. “Olmsted has a double legacy," says writer Adam Gopnik. "On the one hand, he’s a super pragmatist; he’s a problem solver. At the same time, he’s a dreamer. What his parks are all about is finding immensely practical solutions to the problem of building a dream in the middle of a city." Mon, 14 Jul 2014 17:01:00 +0000 Tom Williams 44296 at http://upr.org Designing America on Access Utah Monday Going Beyond Nature Versus Nurture Debate On Thursday's Access Utah http://upr.org/post/going-beyond-nature-versus-nurture-debate-thursdays-access-utah <p>If scientists supposedly now agree it’s not nature versus nurture; but the interaction of nature and nurture, why does the debate still go on? James Tabery, Associate Professor of Philosophy at University of Utah says it’s because those scientists aren’t just arguing about data and results. They’re engaged in a fundamentally philosophical debate about what “the interaction of nature and nurture” actually means. He says that “from disputes in the 1930s regarding eugenic sterilizations, to controversies in the 1970s about the gap in IQ scores for black and white Americans, to the contemporary debate about the causes of depression—this frustratingly persistent debate keeps emerging, even as the cast and context of each iteration of that debate changes from decade to decade.” Thu, 10 Jul 2014 01:00:00 +0000 Tom Williams 43749 at http://upr.org Going Beyond Nature Versus Nurture Debate On Thursday's Access Utah "Gulp: Adventures of the Alimentary Canal" on Wednesday's Access Utah http://upr.org/post/gulp-adventures-alimentary-canal-wednesdays-access-utah <p>In “Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal,” Mary Roach explores the much-maligned but vital tube from mouth to rear that turns food into the nutrients that keep us alive. She introduces us to scientists who tackle questions no one else thinks to ask.&nbsp;Why doesn't the stomach digest itself? Can wine tasters really tell a $10 bottle from a $100 bottle? Why do Americans eat, on average, no more than thirty different foods on a regular basis? “Gulp” is as much about human beings as it is about human bodies. Wed, 09 Jul 2014 19:50:59 +0000 Tom Williams 43750 at http://upr.org "Gulp: Adventures of the Alimentary Canal" on Wednesday's Access Utah