'Operation Rio Grande' Creates New Drug Court For Those Struggling With Addiction

For 35 people arrested as part of Operation Rio Grande, a new specialty drug court is providing an alternative to the traditional court process.

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alternet.org

Immigrant advocates in Utah are vowing to fight back against President Donald Trump's push to rescind a government program protecting hundreds of thousands of young immigrants who were brought into the country illegally as children.

About 50 people gathered Tuesday on the steps of the state Capitol to protest the phasing out of President Barack Obama's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program that includes about 10,000 young immigrants in Utah.

npr.org

A judge is awarding $16 million in a lawsuit filed by a woman married to her cousin at age 14 in a ceremony overseen by polygamous sect leader Warren Jeffs.

A lawyer for Elissa Wall said Wednesday the decision lets attorneys investigate bank accounts and property connected to the secretive group based along the Utah-Arizona border.

4-H And Google Reaching Beyond Agriculture

Sep 5, 2017
blog.google

Google and 4-H programs are now working together to teach useful technology skills to the public. Google donated $1.5 million for trainings, equipment and other useful supplies for 20 different states.

David Francis works in the Utah 4-H extension office and helps provide science, technology, engineering and math programs to the public.

USU's Center for Community Engagement


  

  A group of Utah State University students have created a photo gallery in Caffe Ibis, a coffee shop in downtown Logan. The gallery shares the stories of the women who grow the coffee for the brand Cafe Feminino.

Dennis Stock

A group aiming to reduce gerrymandering held a series of public hearings throughout Utah last week.

The Utah-based health care provider Intermountain Healthcare announced last week that they plan to reduce opioid prescription by 40 percent by the end of 2018.

fairydetox.org

Salt Lake City police have apologized after an officer handcuffed a hospital nurse for refusing a blood draw from an unconscious patient.

sprep.org

Utah air quality regulators have approved plans from a medical waste burning plant cited for toxic emissions in a neighborhood to relocate to a more rural part of the state.

Utah's Division of Air Quality on Friday approved a plan from Illinois-based Stericycle, Inc. to relocate its incinerator from North Salt Lake City to Tooele County and burn two and half times more medical waste each year.

yipa.org

Figures released by the state show 46 people were likely saved during the first six months of the year by police officers who gave them a drug called Naloxone, which reverses the effects of an opioid overdose.

The overdose victims were saved as part of a state-funded pilot program aimed at reducing high rates of opioid death in Utah.

Jereme Gaeta

In Bear Lake, there lives a small, bright blue eyed, bottom-dwelling fish species that may appear insignificant as it moves among the lake’s cobble areas.

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His legacy lies in his eponymous AK-47 assault rifle, one of the world's most popular and lethal weapons, and now Mikhail Kalashnikov's likeness looms over Moscow in the form of a 30-foot-tall monument, but not everyone is happy to see it.

Kalashnikov's daughter, Yelena, unveiled the statue Tuesday at a square off Garden Ring Road, a busy thoroughfare in Russia's capital city, according to Reuters.

For the first time since Hurricane Irma, people who live in the lower islands of the Florida Keys are returning home. For many, that means arriving at a home to no power and no running water. And some who live in Marathon, Summerland and Big Pine Key — islands hard-hit by Irma — found their homes no longer livable.

When Hurricane Irma made landfall on Cudjoe Key last week, it carried winds of 130 miles per hour. For islands like Marathon Key on the "dirty" — more powerful — side of the storm, the storm surge was even more damaging than the winds.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Dylann Roof, on federal death row for gunning down nine people two years ago at a historically black church in Charleston, S.C., wants his legal team dismissed because of the lawyers' ethnicity as he seeks to have his conviction and death sentence overturned.

"My two currently appointed attorneys, Alexandra Yates and Sapna Mirchandani, are Jewish and Indian respectively," Roof wrote in a letter filed Monday with the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. "It is therefore quite literally impossible that they and I could have the same interests relating to my case."

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