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Paula Poundstone Performance & Reception – UPR Exclusive

Credit Paula Poundstone

You hear Paula Poundstone as a regular panelist on NPR’s popular rascal of a weekly news quiz show, Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me! Now you can see her live!

MEET PAULA POUNDSTONE

Join UPR for an evening of comedy and a private reception with Paula on Saturday, January 17, 2015, at the Ellen Eccles Theatre in Logan.

While available, UPR has 10 packages which include:

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Science Questions
1:32 pm
Fri January 6, 2012

What We Can Learn from the CCC

Science Questions profiles the Civilian Conservation Corp and its impact on how we manage our public lands today.

Access Utah
1:27 pm
Fri January 6, 2012

Bioprospecting the Great Salt Lake & a Profile of the Civilian Conservation Corp

On Access Utah, Bonnie Baxter, Professor of Biology at Westminster college, talks about bioprospecting in the Great Salt Lake and new state management strategies that will address how to clean up toxic heavy metals.

At 9:30 Science Questions profiles the Civilian Conservation Corp and its impact on how we manage our public lands today.

It's All Politics
1:27 pm
Fri January 6, 2012

Not Officially Republicans, 'Undeclared' Voters Could Sway N.H. Race

Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman shakes hands with voters following a business lunch campaign event in Portsmouth, N.H. on Jan. 5.
JESSICA RINALDI Reuters /Landov

In Tuesday's primary, many of those showing up to vote will not be registered as Republicans. In New Hampshire, voters unaffiliated with either party can vote in the primary.

So-called "undeclared" voters outnumber both Republicans and Democrats in the Granite State, accounting for more than 40 percent of the electorate. That makes New Hampshire's independent vote a tempting, but elusive target.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Fri January 6, 2012

SuperPACs, Candidates: Dancing Solo Or Together?

Originally published on Fri January 6, 2012 4:54 pm

This is the season of the presidential superPACs: They flooded Iowa with attack ads, and now they are looking ahead to primaries in South Carolina and Florida.

SuperPACs (political action committees) can solicit big, corporate contributions — something candidates can't do. And, according to the law, superPACs are barred from coordinating their ads with the candidates they support. But it's not nearly that simple.

A SuperPAC Attacks

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Fri January 6, 2012

Near Icy Waters, Marine Life Gets By Swimmingly

Hairy-chested yeti crabs, seven-armed sea stars, white octopuses — all these creatures were seen for the first time by researchers in the Antarctic. Robert Siegel talks to biologist Alex Rodgers of the University of Oxford, who led the expedition.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Fri January 6, 2012

Navajo Code Talker Keith Little Dies

One of the last remaining Navajo Code Talkers from World War II has died. Keith Little, who transmitted codes in important Pacific battles such as Iwo Jima and Saipan, died Tuesday at 87. He led the Navajo Code Talkers Association in recent years and fought to get recognition for the Code Talkers, who were ordered to keep their contribution to the war effort secret for decades after the war ended.

NPR Story
1:00 pm
Fri January 6, 2012

In Syria, Suicide Bomber Kills More Than Two Dozen

Originally published on Fri January 6, 2012 3:58 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Syrian officials are vowing to respond with an iron fist to a suicide bombing in Damascus today, 25 people were killed. It was the second deadly bomb attack in the Syrian capital in recent weeks. The government and opposition activists traded accusations as to who was responsible. And the bombing raised fears of escalating violence, as the Arab League presses Syria to implement a peace plan.

NPR's Peter Kenyon is monitoring developments in Syria from Istanbul.

(SOUNDBITE OF SIRENS)

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Fri January 6, 2012

Justice Department Redefines Rape

The Justice Department is redefining the criminal definition of "rape" for the first time since the 1920s. It will now include same-sex assaults and a definition beyond actual intercourse. This will change the way local police departments report crime statistics.

Photography
1:00 pm
Fri January 6, 2012

A Digital Death? Why Kodak Stopped Clicking

Kodak's Steven J. Sasson holds the world's first digital camera, which he built in 1975, at Kodak headquarters in Rochester, N.Y., in 2005. The company is now trying to sell about a thousand patents for digital photography to prevent bankruptcy.
David Duprey AP

Originally published on Fri January 6, 2012 11:11 pm

The end could soon be near for Kodak, and the iconic film manufacturer may have itself to blame.

Kodak, based in Rochester, N.Y., could be headed into bankruptcy over the next few weeks. The company has seen its profits plunge in recent years, largely because of the popularity of digital cameras.

Kodak is trying to move into new product lines like inkjet printers, but in the meantime it's attempting to raise cash by selling off some of the patents it's developed over the years.

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Sports
1:00 pm
Fri January 6, 2012

An Update On Football — And The Other Football

The NFL kicks off an exciting weekend of games Saturday when it starts its playoffs. Meanwhile, there's big news in the sport that most of the rest of the world calls football. Fox television is making a major play to air more soccer games in this country, including an English Premier League game before the Super Bowl. Sportswriter Stefan Fatsis talks with Robert Siegel about the news in both kinds of football.

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