The Two-Way
1:13 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Foxconn Resolves Dispute With Workers Who Threatened Suicide

Originally published on Thu February 9, 2012 2:43 pm

Earlier this month, a group Chinese workers at Foxconn spent two days on the roof of one of the companies factories in central China. As The Telegraph reported, the workers were threatening to commit suicide to protest their working conditions.

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The Salt
1:08 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Why X-Rayed Food Isn't Radioactive, And Other Puzzles

Irradiation is most often used to kill insects, parasites, or bacteria in or on spices, which are typically dried outdoors in before being shipped.
Lui Kit Wong MCT /Landov

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 2:23 pm

Earlier this week, we were surprised to learn that food manufacturers increasingly X-ray foods to screen for foreign objects that can break a tooth. That sounds like a good idea.

But the notion of X-rayed food also sparked a lively debate in The Salt's comments section on whether this poses a health threat. After all, we do know that some X-rays can damage DNA in the human body. So what does radiation mean for food?

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The Two-Way
1:04 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Court-Martial Recommended For Bradley Manning In WikiLeaks Case

Army Pvt. Bradley Manning last month.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 1:28 pm

An investigating officer has recommended that Army private Bradley Manning face court-martial on multiple criminal charges related to the downloading of nearly 1 million war logs and secret diplomatic cables. Manning is accused of taking the files and them passing them on to WikiLeaks.

If he does face a court martial and is convicted, he could be sentenced to life in prison.

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Movie Reviews
1:02 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

An 'Iron Lady' Fully Inhabited By Meryl Streep

Meryl Streep (center) stars as Margaret Thatcher in Phyllida Lloyd's biopic about the former prime minister of the United Kingdom.
The Weinstein Co.

Originally published on Fri January 13, 2012 10:12 am

I admit I was biased against the Margaret Thatcher biopic The Iron Lady. Not, you understand, against Thatcher and her Tory politics. Against Meryl Streep and her accents. Which are great, no doubt. But I went in resolved not to fall for her pyrotechnics yet again. I wanted realism.

Well, it didn't take long to realize that I was watching not only one of the greatest impersonations I'd ever seen β€” but one that was also emotionally real.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

A Look At Haiti, Two Years After The Quake

More than half a million people are still living in tent camps in Haiti, and tons of quake rubble has yet to be cleared away. But two years after a massive earthquake leveled Haiti's capital and killed hundreds of thousands of people, optimism is beginning to bloom. The nation remains fragile, but reconstruction is picking up and the new government of President Michel Martelly has created a sense of relative stability.

World
1:00 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Walton Discusses Aftermath Of Haiti Quake

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 8:12 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Now a snapshot of public health in Haiti two years after the earthquake.

I'm joined by Dr. David Walton of the non-profit group Partners in Health. He's directing the construction of a new hospital about 30 miles north of Port-au-Prince in Mirebalais.

Dr. Walton, welcome to the program.

DR. DAVID WALTON: Thank so much for having me.

BLOCK: Sounds like a big hospital that you're in the process of building; 320 beds, 180,000 square feet. What are your hopes for that hospital?

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Around the Nation
1:00 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Old South Rings Again In Boston

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 8:12 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Today at noon, America's oldest working clock tower rang out for the first time since the 1800s.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL RINGING)

CORNISH: Old South Meeting House in Boston was a Puritan gathering place. Ben Franklin was baptized there and the Boston Tea Party was planned there, but the belfry has been silent since 1876, after the brick building was nearly destroyed in the great Boston fire.

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Technology
1:00 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

Who Should Control The Internet?

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, known as ICANN, is forging ahead with plans to sell new domain categories despite vocal opposition. The decision raises questions about who should govern the Internet.
mipan iStockphoto.com

For the first time, organizations can apply for an Internet address all their own, marking the start of a new era in the growth of the Internet.

For example, ".com" and ".org" could be replaced by ".starbucks" or ".newyork."

The expansion was planned by the one organization empowered to regulate the global Internet β€” the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN.

Debate over the new policy has highlighted the key issue of who, if anyone, should control the Internet.

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The Two-Way
12:40 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

In Alaska: Nome Still Waits For Fuel, Big Shovels Headed To Cordova

A member of the Alaska National Guard clearing a walkway in Cordova earlier this week.
Spc. Balinda O'Neal, Alaska National Guard AP

Originally published on Mon January 16, 2012 6:55 am

  • Tony Gorman, reporting from Valdez

It's hard to fathom from afar just how rough the weather has been in parts of Alaska for the past month or so. It's winter, sure. But things have been particularly brutal. And there seems to be no end in sight.

Here's some of the latest news about how thing are going:

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Environment
12:32 pm
Thu January 12, 2012

To Slow Climate Change, Cut Down On Soot, Ozone

An Indian street dweller prepares food on the streets of Kolkata. A growing number of scientists say that reducing black carbon β€” mostly soot from burning wood, charcoal and dung β€” would have an immediate and powerful impact on climate.
Deshakalyan Chowdhury AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 12, 2012 8:12 pm

Politically, climate change is off this year's campaign agenda. Jobs, the economy and social issues are front and center.

But scientists are working as hard as ever to figure out how much the Earth is warming and what to do about it. Some now say it's time for a new strategy, one that gets faster results.

Talk to Durwood Zaelke, for example. Zaelke is a grizzled veteran of the climate wars: He was in Kyoto in 1997 when the world's nations drafted a treaty promising to curb warming, and he has watched that promise fizzle while the planet's temperature continues to rise.

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